When You’re Homesick for a Place or People who are No Longer There

I’ve been reading my way through the “Anne of Green Gables” books and earlier this week I came across a great quote from L.M. Montgomery in “Anne of the Island.”  It was the scene when Anne and one her good friends and roommate from the past three years, Phil, were taking one last walk through their rental to say goodbye to the house. 

Anne wondered if old dreams could haunt rooms – if, when one left forever the room where she had joyed and suffered and laughed and wept, something of her, intangible and invisible, yet nonetheless real, did not remain behind like a voiceful memory. 

“”I think,” said Phil, “that a room where one dreams and grieves and rejoices and lives becomes inseparably connected with those processes and acquires a personality of its own.  I am sure if I came into this room fifity years from now it would say ‘Anne, Anne’ to me.” Montgomery, L.M.. “Anne of the Island.” Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc.. 1943. pp. 221-222.

There was something about that house and those rooms and the lives they lived in there that made it seem like their happy little existence would go on living forever, despite empty rooms and absent friends.

I feel the same way about my mom’s house.

Before my mom had passed last September, she told us that she wanted us to sell her house.  There were many reasons why she felt that way, and, at the end of the day, she would let us decide what we would do but she wanted us to know how she felt.  In the end, we did sell it and it sold quickly.

The new owners have been busy making it their own, so our former neighbours and dear friends tell us.  They’ve been tearing out flooring, bathrooms, a chimney, redoing the electrical system, getting rid of all the brick downstairs, and the wooden panelling, converting the kitchen to a mud/laundry room and moving the kitchen back to what used to be our old kitchen before our family renovated the house 24 years ago. 

While I’m sad that the house will have changed so much, I am curious to see the finished results.  I like knowing that new life has been breathed into it.  I’m also relieved.  My mom’s house is no longer the same and forever it will, in my mind at least, be the last place where our family lived and loved and pressed on despite the sorrow that enveloped us.

I can’t go back to her old house.  She’s no longer there.  And the house is no longer the same.  Life has changed.  But there’s a conversation I dream I can hear from the other side of the hedge and fence.  I dream there is laughter and a face full of joy.  I’m homesick but it’s for a place and a person who are no longer there.

As I think about my situation, I’m sure there are others, involved in missions work and or in secular vocations, who can identify with me, as well.  For those serving cross-culturally and preparing to go back to your passport country for the summer or longer, you may be facing the reality that loved ones are no longer in your hometown.  Friends and family may have moved away or, in some cases, have passed away.

So what do you do when you’re homesick like this?  What do you do when you’re homesick for a place and people who are no longer there?

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1. Grieve your loss(es).

There’s so much that could be said on this point that I could write a book.  And maybe I will.  But not today.  For now, I’ll suggest that you give yourself space, time, and self-care as you grieve the loss of your significant people or person and your special but changed places.  Be kind to yourself in this season.    

2. Take time to pause and express thankfulness to God. 

Thank Him for your past, present and future and for the people He’s put into your life and will put into your life.  When I thank God in this way, I’m able to grieve with hope and joy.  Despite what seems like an oxymoron, joy and grief can and do co-exist.

3. Redeem a place with new memories.

The pain of your loss may be overwhelming and paralyzing, at times, and may be heightened when you are back in that place and your person or people are no longer there.  Don’t be afraid to enter those spaces again, but, when you’re ready, begin to make new memories there.  Initiate creating community and new adventures.  Invite friends to meet for a picnic at a park where you used to go for walks with your loved one.  Start a new Christmas tradition, while infusing some of the precious traditions you shared with your loved one.    

4. Create your pile of stones.

In the Bible, God’s people often built or did something to cause them and their descendants to remember a specific act of God.  In the book of Joshua, chapter four, the people of Israel constructed a pile of twelve stones as a testimony of what God had done to bring His people into the promised land.

“And those twelve stones, which they took out of the Jordan, Joshua set up at Gilgal. And he said to the people of Israel, “When your children ask their fathers in times to come, ‘What do these stones mean?’ then you shall let your children know, ‘Israel passed over this Jordan on dry ground.’ For the Lord your God dried up the waters of the Jordan for you until you passed over, as the Lord your God did to the Red Sea, which he dried up for us until we passed over, so that all the peoples of the earth may know that the hand of the Lord is mighty, that you may fear the Lord your God forever.” (Joshua 4:2-24, ESV)

There are a lot of ways to remember how God has helped you, provided for you, counselled you and shown his love for you.  You could make a physical object, like a pile of stones, or a painting or sculpture.  You could take a picture of a place, person or event, frame it and place it somewhere in your house where you would take notice of it frequently. The bathroom?  The kitchen near the sink? On your bedside table?  Choose what works for you.  Another way of remembering is through words – journaling or writing a poem or even a book.  Ask the Lord how to show you how to commemorate your loved one or place.

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This list has no time limit and there is no one method for accomplishing each of these steps.  They do not need to be done in chronological order and may even be done simultaneously.   

I suggest that you invite a friend to journey with you in the process.  Find someone who can listen well and love you as you share about your loss(es).  You may find it helpful for them to keep you accountable for some aspect of your journey.  Try journaling as a way to process each step.  I find writing a cathartic experience and I appreciate looking back and seeing how I’ve grown and what I’ve learned along the way.  Maybe you will too.

But most of all, know that you’re not alone in missing someone who is no longer in your life.  You have good company with people who are also grieving various losses.

We may be homesick, and that’s okay.  May it not end there.  Let us look to the future, into Christ’s face.  

“I can do all things through him who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:16, ESV

Five Minute Friday: Adapt #FMF

One of the first things you may hear when you’re preparing to go to the mission field is to be ready to adapt.  Obviously, when you move to a different country and a different culture and a different language, you will NEED to adapt.  I’m not talking about that.  Yes, that’s important and yes, that will be something to work on but I’m talking about a different adapting.  I’m talking about adapting your expectations.

You’ll be faced with a barrage of situations where what you understood going into the situation will not be how things will turn out.  You’ll need to be flexible and – wait for it – adapt.

It will require you to be humble, take the position of a learner and listener and observer (because how often is communication something done instead of something said) and release your understanding and preconceived ideas.

Adapting in this way will require you to accept a level of ambiguity but it will allow you to receive opportunities to deepen relationships and cultural understanding that will only aid your ministry.

It’s a small thing with the potential for a big impact.

Five Minute Friday: Stuck

I half awoke during an afternoon nap, where my two-year-old was asleep on a mat on the floor and my almost five-year-old was beside me, clicking a plastic container with pretend grapes inside.  All that I can remember now is that in that half asleep state, I had solved the problem that was gnawing on me when I originally drifting off.

The gnaw was a hurt that I had forgotten about; so why had it resurfaced?  I had remembered something that had happened before the hurt because of a number of familiar people I saw today.

I remembered that a season had ended with no opportunity to say goodbye to my teammates or to hear goodbye from them.  This ending was complicated but not, and my choice… but not.  And as I remembered this hurt that ate away at me, I felt simply stuck.  Like a broken record.  Like a toy train going around the same track. Like a lie that Satan had tried to convince me of.

Now that I’m writing these memories down, I also remember that my solution in my half asleep state was to reprogram the narrative.  Huh.  That’s actually a good start.

Songkhran Family Day 2018

With our up-coming move to Canada in August, this weekend marks our last Songkhran (Thai New Year) festival in Thailand for many years.

So, here’s to making happy memories, to spending time with family, and to a new year where we, and, we pray, the many people groups of Thailand will draw closer to the Lord.

Sawatdii pii mai jaow!

an “old friend”

I am marrying such a romantic – and I love it!  [But love him even more so :)]

On the way up to Chiang Rai on Thursday, Wee would periodically pull off the road so we could visit a relative of his, or point in the direction of a house we were passing saying that a cousin or uncle or auntie lived there.  So when he pulled over to do a u-turn and said that he was stopping off to visit an old friend I thought we were visiting an old friend of his.

I am so gullible.

We stopped.  He parked in front of someone’s driveway.  We both got out.  He went to where the old man was selling flowers and bought some lilies and another kind of flower and had the man wrap them up in newspaper.  Then he handed them to me and, smiling, said, “an old friend.”

My fiance has bought me flowers regularly throughout our dating history.  He claims he’s not very romantic but I emphatically say otherwise.  🙂

reflecting upon recent international news

‎”Have I any pleasure in the death of the wicked, declares the Lord God, and not rather that he should turn from his way and live?…For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, declares the Lord God; so turn, and live.” Ezekiel 18:23, 32

“Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” -Martin Luther King, Jr

after the rain

It’s been raining since Monday.  Literally.  Raining non-stop.  And cold.  Like cold-season cold in Mae Hong Son cold.

I shut the windows in my house yesterday because I couldn’t stand the cold anymore.  But my kitchen windows just have screens and no glass panes and so the cold stuck around in my house.

Even my cats were cold.  And stir-crazy.  They were manic yesterday – days and days stuck inside the house, only venturing out to hide underneath my truck in the driveway for a few minutes before they, in absolute disgust, flew back into the house scolding me for the wet and the cold.

But late late last night the rain stopped.  I think.  Well at least it wasn’t raining again in the morning.  No sounds of water pouring down from the skies.  No sounds of even drips from the roof.  The birds were chirping, and the sun – oh the sun! – showed itself and welcomed itself in through the front windows and screen door of my house.

My windows are still shut.  And I’m bundled up as I sit and drink hot Earl Grey with HOT oatmeal porridge.  But it’s looking like it’s gonna be a good day.

I really shouldn’t complain though.  Usually March is seasoned with smokey skies, temperatures steadily increasing to hot season norms.  And certainly NO rain.

So I don’t know where this cold front and non-stop rain (also very unusual – even in rainy season it doesn’t rain non-stop for days and days; just big downpours for periods of time during the day – sometimes only once or twice a day or none even at all) came from.  But the sunbeams in my house are a welcome sight today.

I’ll need to remember I said that in about a month’s time when the heat’s intense.

Oh, and my cats were out the door first thing this morning following some breakfast.  Now they can be manic outside and return back to their normal selves: still slightly crazy.