driving and learning

Driving in Thailand is best compared to driving a boat on a river. Picture a river that’s wide at one point but begins to narrow. Boats give way to other boats and the smaller boats fit in where they can. Your boat glides from one side of the river to the middle and then you speed up and paddle around a slow boat.

There are lines on the roads here indicating what they’d indicate pretty much anywhere in the world. Although the lines exist, they too tend to be a little fluid.

My friend Kristen told me a few weeks ago that “you can do pretty much whatever you want when you’re driving but do it slowly.” At times you need to be bold and just go – edge out and get in there. But in the next moment, you may need to give way to another truck or motorbike.

Horns aren’t really used here. I shouldn’t say that they’re not really used, but rather they’re used differently. Thai people value having ‘cool hearts’ and don’t show strong emotions. So it would be rare to have someone vent their frustration with their horn. Drivers often use their horns on blind corners, like on the road to Mae Hong Son.

I had a full day of driving in Chiang Mai as we were running around doing errands and I’m again exhausted (yesterday we drove here – that was also extremely tiring). I had been somewhat terrified of driving here but I think I almost enjoyed it today.

I praise God for His help in getting around the city and doing it safely. I really shouldn’t let fear or anxieties influence me like they do sometimes. Why am I so quick to forget past experiences when the Lord helped me overcome something? Why can’t I build from these times and not revert back to fear? Oh Lord, help me.

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